Category: Get Smart

Just because we’re experienced and savvy doesn’t mean we can’t keep learning, right? Together, we get smarter!

Cybersecurity Step-by-step #6: Avoid Using Public WiFi Networks

Published in: Blog, Cybersecurity Step-by-Step, Get Smart |

Your financial well-being is our highest priority, and one of our goals for 2018 is to walk you through the necessary steps to protect your online data. To make it more manageable, we are sending you one new action item every month. If you missed the previous steps, we have listed them below with a link to the detail so that you can easily catch up.

Step Six: Avoid using public WiFi networks

Why?  Hackers can position themselves between you and the access point and they can capture the data you are sending out. Also, hackers are very good at imitating public WiFi connections and may trick you into logging directly into their networks (watch this video).

What if you are only browsing Pinterest or watching sports? Effective phishers can find ways to use this information. For example, a phisher might send you an email with a link for discount tickets to see your favorite team. You might be tempted to click on the link and accidentally download something harmful, like a virus or malware.

A password requirement for public WiFi is a good indicator that the information you send over the network will be encrypted using one of two security protocols: WPA or WEP (click here to learn more). Unfortunately, vulnerabilities have been discovered in these protocols. To protect yourself from these vulnerabilities, see Step #2 of Cybersecurity Step-by-step (listed below)

Fortunately, there are simple solutions:

  • When using your mobile phone in public, turn off your WiFi access. Use your cellular data connection.
  • When using your computer in public, you can turn your mobile phone into a secure personal WiFi hotspot (Watch these video tutorials: for iOS; for android)
  • Consider using a Virtual Private Network (VPN) Learn more

List of Previous Steps:

Step One: Place a freeze on your credit history at the top three credit agencies.

Step Two: Update the operating software on your computers, tablets and smartphones, and continue to update as new patches become available.

Step Three: File your tax returns as early as possible.

Step Four: Use unique passwords on every site (and try a password manager)

Step Five: Never (ever) email sensitive information and always insist on encryption

 

Myth #3: Women Are More Risk Averse Than Men

Published in: Blog, Financial Myth Busting Series, Get Smart |

At The Humphreys Group, it’s no secret that we revere the many ways women today are breaking through gender stereotypes. Lately, we’ve been especially fascinated by stereotypes that permeate discussions about women and money. These phrases probably sound familiar: “Women aren’t interested in investing. They lack confidence about their financial decisions. When women do invest, they’re too risk averse.” By and large, these – as well as many other commonly accepted notions in finance, by the way – are all myths.

That’s why we’re going to spend the coming weeks busting myths about women and money and shining a light on the data that disproves them. We’ll also share what we’ve learned from our work with clients, and offer some thoughts on what we can all do to re-direct the conversation from myth to truth.

It probably comes as no surprise to learn that women are less likely than men to take physical risks. We participate in fewer extreme sports like sky diving and rock climbing. We engage in illicit drug use less often. And when we’re behind the wheel of a car, we’re less likely to speed, tailgate, drive drunk, and we’re more inclined to wear a seat belt. So, it’s easy to assume that we take fewer financial risks as well. The financial services industry has long labeled women as more “risk averse,” and some commentators even have the audacity to attribute this to our hormonal or biological compositions!

Consider this myth busted.  Truth is, women are not as risk averse as you may think.

In 2015, Merrill Lynch asked 5,000 women about their investing beliefs and behavior. When asked if they believe risk is worth it, the answer was a resounding yes: 85% said they agree that risk taking is beneficial, and 81% said they can adapt to changing markets and investment outcomes. The firm also found that men and women who share the same level of financial knowledge exhibit the same risk behavior.[1] Even more interesting is a 2012 meta-analysis of over 25 economic studies regarding risk tolerance differences between men and women. The researchers found that the difference between genders was negligible, and even concluded that this perception of women as cautious investors “appears to perhaps be rooted more in confirmation bias than in reality.”[2]  In other words, our expectation that women are risk averse may be skewing our perception of what is really going on.

All this would seem to imply that women have a healthy appetite for investment risk, and a lot of the time, that’s true. But unlike men, women are more mindful about what the dangers are before diving in. We take the time to evaluate whether the reward justifies the risk.

Sallie Krawcheck, former Wall Street executive and founder of Ellevest, explains this by differentiating between risk aversion and risk awareness. It’s true that women are often more aware of risk. We are more likely to be invested in an age-based allocation that diversifies across asset classes, for example, and less likely to be fully invested in equities than men.[3] Fortunately, this clearly puts us at an advantage: we’re prioritizing diversification over trendy or unsustainable investments – a successful long-term strategy. And as you know from the first myth we busted (check our blog if you missed it https://humphreysgroup.com/financial-myth-busting-series/) our skills as investors pay off in the long term!

But there’s a bigger story happening here. As our incomes increase, so does our tolerance for risk. 54% of women who earn more than $200,000 are willing to take “a significant investment risk” to earn higher returns, compared to 32% of the broader population of investors. High earning women are also more likely than lower earning women to own more volatile investments, like commodities, hedge funds and venture capital.[4] This makes sense, considering those with higher incomes have more resources – and the higher margin of error that comes with it.

Unfortunately, most women do not earn six figure incomes, and further still, most of us are undercompensated relative to our male peers. Therein lies the best explanation for our risk averse reputation: when we start off with less, we won’t allow ourselves to jeopardize what we’ve already saved – we have less risk capacity. The issue is not that women are wary of taking on risk; it’s that they don’t have as much to risk in the first place. Men, on the other hand, have reported taking on financial risk because they — quite correctly — feel they could easily make up for investment losses with their earnings.[5] This is not a luxury that most women have.

In Our Experience:

  • Education is always a good place to start, and women are already good at doing their homework and the research needed to get smart. What’s most important is to take risk that’s appropriate to your situation.
  • Be risk smart: think about your risk capacity (how much risk you are able to take on, given your resources, expertise, and plan) versus your risk tolerance (how emotionally comfortable you are with taking investment risk).
  • Diversification is your friend: you can reduce risk by diversifying across types of investments, by investing consistently over time and by maintaining a long-term investment horizon.

Our Advice to You:

  • The tradeoff between risk and reward is the holy grail of investing. Spend some time getting smart about how diversification works, how investments react differently to economic, market and geopolitical news.  No need to read The Economist cover to cover, but you may want to start with a classic, Random Walk Down Wall Street by Burton Malkiel.
  • Consider that risk and reward go hand in hand. Work with an advisor to get a clear sense of the level of investment risk needed to accomplish your goals.  If the risk level is too high for your risk tolerance, you may need to refine your goals or make other changes.
  • Don’t apologize if you have a low tolerance for risk. We all have different prerequisites for sleeping well at night.  Taking too much risk can backfire if you make a rash investment decision in a moment of panic or stress.

Ready for a deeper dive? Give us a call if you have questions or would like to talk – we’re here to help.

What’s next?  Stay tuned for Myth #4:  Women lack confidence about money.

 

[1] “Women and Investing: A Behavioral Finance Perspective,” Michael Liersch, Fall 2015

[2] “Are Women Really More Risk-Averse than Men?” Julie Nelson, University of Massachusetts, Boston, September 2012

[3] “Who’s the Better Investor: Men or Women?” Fidelity, May 2017

[4] “High Income Women Investors,” Spectrem Group, January 2015

[5] Shortchanged: Why Women Have Less Wealth and What Can Be Done About It, Mariko Chang, 2010

Cybersecurity Step-by-Step #5: Always Insist on Encryption

Published in: Cybersecurity Step-by-Step, Get Smart |

 

Your financial well-being is our highest priority, and in 2018 we aim to walk you through the necessary steps to protect your online data. We can imagine that although you would rather do almost anything else, you are as concerned as we are about keeping your data safe. To make it more manageable, we are sending you one new action item every month. If you missed the previous steps, we have listed them below with a link to the detail so that you can easily catch up.

Step Five:  Never (ever) email sensitive information and always insist on encryption

Why?  Phishers are experts at impersonating service providers such as mortgage brokers and tax-preparers who need to gather sensitive information. They know that when so many documents are exchanged, it can be very tempting to cut corners and attach an unencrypted document.

Whenever you must give a service provider sensitive information online, insist that they provide you with a secure encrypted method to transmit your information. If unavailable, consider sending your sensitive information by fax (they still exist!) or a reliable delivery service.

To learn more about phishing and how to protect yourself, follow this link to the Federal Trade Commission’s website.

Visit this link to view a Kahn Academy video about how encryption works.

 

List of Previous Steps:

Step One: Place a freeze on your credit history at the top three credit agencies.

Step Two: Update the operating software on your computers, tablets and smartphones, and continue to update as new patches become available.

Step Three: File your tax returns as early as possible.

Step Four: Use unique passwords on every site (and try a password manager)

What is Financial Life Planning?

Published in: Blog, Conversation Circle, Get Smart |

Most financial advisors will tell you that emotions and investing are two things best kept in isolation. Emotions cloud your judgment, they say. Emotions provoke irrational behavior and have no place among the pie charts and annualized returns on your financial plan. Best to compartmentalize your feelings and save them for your therapy appointments.  We believe that the idea you’re your emotions should remain separate from money and investing is a myth.

As advisors, we believe that expertise and empathy both have a role to play in money matters. Anyone who focuses on one at the expense of the other is presenting a false choice.  Further, we have seen that self-reflection leads to self-knowledge, which leads to self-confidence, which in turn leads to better decisions and timely implementation.  It’s not just about feeling good. That’s important, of course, and we want as much of that for ourselves and our clients as possible. But we’ve also seen that embracing our emotional sides and having those pivotal conversations leads to better financial outcomes.

Financial life planning is a holistic process that puts your interests first and focuses on increasing your sense of financial well-being and life satisfaction.  Initially, this process will help you clarify your values, priorities, circumstances and aspirations; and then guide you in defining and designing your unique version of the “rich life.”  Not only that, financial life planning will increase your understanding of the habits and attitudes that will facilitate your financial and life goals and support successful life transitions.

Because of the unpredictability of life and the complexity of financial markets, it is important to work with a financial advisor who will help you to achieve your financial and life goals.  And, it is essential to select an advisor who will take the time to truly get to know you and to understand your concerns and your dreams.

We encourage you to consider working with a financial advisor who shares this philosophy and who is willing to tackle these issues with you.  There are a range of “discovery” methods and tools that advisors use to frame the process and the discussion.  We are big fans of Money Quotient, a non-profit that offers financial advisors tools and training to help and inspire clients to look inward to maximize resources and live purposeful lives.  You can find such an advisor here – check it out!

www.moneyquotient.org/advisor-search/

 

Myth #2: Emotion and personal values should be kept separate from money and investing

Published in: Blog, Financial Myth Busting Series, Get Smart |

 

Most financial advisors will tell you that emotions and investing are two things best kept in isolation. Emotions cloud your judgment, they say. Emotions provoke irrational behavior and have no place among the pie charts and annualized returns on your financial plan. Best to compartmentalize your feelings and save them for your therapy appointments.

We might be surprising our peers in the industry when we say this, but here goes: the idea you’re your emotions should remain separate from money and investing is a myth.

This myth is partially derived from the conventional wisdom that thinking and feeling are two separate processes implemented by different regions of the brain. It shouldn’t be difficult to detach yourself from your emotions if you just turn off that part of your mind for a few minutes, right? Well, modern neuroscience research has shown that those areas in our brain are actually highly interconnected by neurons that translate both cognitive and emotional messages.[1] For this reason, it’s nearly impossible to completely disentangle our thoughts and feelings, try as we might. One pair of researchers highlighted a common experience that emphasizes this point: you may justify a car purchase by claiming you got a good deal, when the determining factor may truly have been that you liked how the car made you feel.[2]
Read more

Trade Wars 101: Get the scoop from Schwab’s Chief Investment Strategist

Published in: Blog, Get Smart |

The headlines are filled with warnings and predictions – ranging from alarmist to sanguine – about the trade war that’s heating up between the US and China.

Liz Ann Sonders, Schwab’s Chief Investment Strategist does a great job of walking through the key points and providing some perspective.

https://www.schwab.com/resource-center/insights/content/trade-mistakes-will-trade-spat-turn-into-trade-war

 

How to Find and Vet Your Financial Advisor

Published in: Blog, Financial Myth Busting Series, Get Smart |

Thinking about working with a financial advisor?  Finding the right advisor, who’s services and approach match your needs, can take some time, patience and persistence.   Here’s a place to start, NAPFA, the professional organization for fee-only financial advisors where you can “find and advisor” and get a list of important questions to ask.  As you begin, think about what type of financial advice you need, that is, what you want to delegate and what you wish to keep in-house. Most importantly, find and work with advisors who support and respect you.

 

 

Insights & Outcomes: Being Brave

Published in: Blog, Conversation Circle, Get Smart |

Being Brave: Navigating Money Talk With Loved Ones

Why did we title this conversation “Being Brave?” Financial services giant TIAA conducted a study in March 2017, to get parents’ and adult children’s thoughts on money conversations. Although 75-85% of both parents and children consider financial conversations to be very important, only 11% of parents and 37% of adult children say they’re likely to initiate a conversation about any financial topic. And what usually happens when families do talk about money? According to the study they are overly generalized and happen spontaneously, at the spur of the moment. This is where the bravery comes in. Tackling a money conversation with loved ones is uncommon and we usually don’t see it modelled in our culture.  But there is a reason to persist. When families do have financial conversations, the outcome is usually positive: about half of the parents who talked with their children frequently about their future financial plans felt proud about how those conversations went – as they should. These parents also reported feeling happy and uplifted.  It’s not easy, it’s not our cultural norm, and it takes courage.  But the benefit is that the bond between loved ones can be strengthened and the level of support among family members reinforced.
Read more

Cybersecurity Step-by-Step #4: Use Unique Passwords

Published in: Blog, Cybersecurity Step-by-Step, Get Smart |

Your financial well-being is our highest priority, and one of our goals for 2018 is to walk you through the necessary steps to protect your online data. We can imagine that although you would rather do almost anything else, you are as concerned as we are about keeping your data safe. To make it more manageable, we are sending you one new action item every month. If you missed the previous steps, we have listed them below with a link to the detail so that you can easily catch up.

Step Four:  Use unique passwords on every site (and try a password manager)

Why?  The technology to hack and crack passwords has advanced and if you are using the same password for multiple sites, it could become the keys to your kingdom.

We hate them too, but until the need for passwords is replaced for good, we all have to dedicate precious time and memory to this security hassle. And to make matters worse, websites are requiring even longer and more complicated passwords, making them nearly impossible to remember.

Well, we have a solution! Consider using a password manager. They are relatively easy to use and a significant timesaver. We are familiar with Dashlane, LastPass and Keychain Access (for Macs), but there are several others that are highly rated.  Follow this link to a Consumer Reports article that provides everything you need to know about password managers.

Visit this link for more information about why strong, unique passwords matter.

List of Previous Steps:

Step One: Place a freeze on your credit history at the top three credit agencies.

Step Two: Update the operating software on your computers, tablets and smartphones, and continue to update as new patches become available.

Step Three: File your tax returns as early as possible.

Recent Market Volatility

Published in: Blog, Get Smart |

The first quarter of 2018 has been a stark reminder that volatility is a reality that investors can’t avoid, particularly when it comes to the equity markets.  You’ve heard us say it before, but it bears repeating when times are tough:  volatility is a normal part of investing and remaining calm during big (or even small) market declines is an important ingredient for long term investment success.  We hope the attached article provides some helpful perspective for the next rocky patch.

Dimensional – Recent Market Volatility